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Birmingham Guild of Handicraft | Arts & Crafts Chandelier | England c.1890

£2,195.00

A rare and important copper and brass arts and crafts chandelier originally designed for gas but now converted to electricity. Attributed to The Birmingham Guild of Handicraft due to the intricate and stylish hand beaten copper central dish and swirling brass fonds. Now complimented with 3 original period vaseline glass lampshades probably by James Powell & Sons of Whiterfriars. England c.1890

Click Here for a video of the light

Ht.97cm/38in, Diam.74/29

N.B The light can be reduced in height to a drop of 70cm/28in if required for a small charge. Please call or email to enquire about this service.

The Birmingham Guild of Handicraft 1888-1905

  • Birmingham Guild of Handicraft was an Arts & Crafts organisation. Its motto was ‘By Hammer and Hand’.

  • Around 1888 It began as a loose part of the Birmingham Kyrle Society, then became a more fully formed group within the Kyrle Society in 1890

  • In 1895, the Guild set up as an independent workshop and limited company with the guidance of Edward R. Taylor.

  • The Guild produced furniture and metal-ware, taking special advantage of the switch to electric lighting and the consequent need for new light fittings.

  • Arthur Dixon was the chief designer and head of metalwork workshop. Other members were Albert Edward Jones and Thomas Birkett.

  • Due to commercial pressures, there was a merger with E & R Gittins in 1905

Whitefriars Glass Company, London

James Powell & Sons

  • In 1834 James Powell,  then a 60-year-old London wine merchant and entrepreneur, purchased the Whitefriars Glass Company, a small glass-works off Fleet Street in London.

  • Powell, and his sons Arthur and Nathanael, were newcomers to glass making, but soon acquired the necessary expertise and specialised in making church stain glass windows.

  • During the latter part of the c.19th, the firm formed a close association with leading architects and designers. Whitefriars produced the glass that Phillip Webb used in his designs for William Morris

  • By 1900 production lines of  vaseline and opalescent glass-ware, including lampshades, were proving to be extremely successful with clients such as William Arthur Smith Benson using their glass in the design of their lights.

  • The firm’s name was changed to Powell & Sons (Whitefriars) Ltd in 1919

 

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